Journal of South Asian Federation of Obstetrics and Gynaecology

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VOLUME 14 , ISSUE 3 ( May-June, 2022 ) > List of Articles

RESEARCH ARTICLE

Maternal Lipid Profile and Its Impact on Pregnancy Outcome

Shazia Parveen, Iffat Zaman, Nasreen Noor, Shagufta Moin, Syed Manazir Ali

Keywords : Gestational diabetes mellitus, Lipid profile, Macrosomia, Preeclampsia, Small for gestational age

Citation Information : Parveen S, Zaman I, Noor N, Moin S, Ali SM. Maternal Lipid Profile and Its Impact on Pregnancy Outcome. J South Asian Feder Obs Gynae 2022; 14 (3):302-306.

DOI: 10.5005/jp-journals-10006-2051

License: CC BY-NC 4.0

Published Online: 30-07-2022

Copyright Statement:  Copyright © 2022; The Author(s).


Abstract

Aim: To evaluate the association of altered lipid levels and development of adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. Materials and methods: Women attending outpatient department (OPD), antenatal care (ANC) and in patient department (IPD) of the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Jawaharlal Nehru Medical College, Hospital, Aligarh Muslim University, Aligarh, were included in this study after obtaining informed consent and ethical approval from the institute. Results: Mean age of pregnant women in the study group was 24.89 ± 3.12 years, whereas in the control group, it was 24.72 ± 3.76 years. Mean prepregnancy weight was 51–55 kg in both study and control groups. Mean BMI of the pregnant women in the study group was 21.89 ± 1.89 kg/m2, whereas in the control group, it was 21.52 ± 1.47 kg/m2. The levels of total cholesterol, triglycerides (TG), low density lipoprotein (LDL) and VLDL were significantly high in women who developed gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) when compared to those who did not develop GDM and the difference was found to be statistically significant (p <0.001). The levels of total cholesterol, TG, and VLDL were significantly high in women who developed preeclampsia as compared to the women who did not develop preeclampsia (p <0.05). The levels of total cholesterol, TG, LDL and VLDL in women who developed preterm labor were found to be significantly high in women who developed preterm labor (p <0.01) as compared to women who did not have PTL. The levels of total cholesterol, TG, LDL, and VLDL in women who developed intrahepatic cholestasis of pregnancy (IHCP) were statistically significant when the two groups were compared (p <0.001). The levels of total cholesterol, TG, LDL, VLDL, in women who developed macrosomia were not statistically significant when the two groups were compared (p >0.05). Women who developed small for gestational age (SGA) had statistically significant high levels of total cholesterol, TG, LDL, and VLDL (p <0.05). Conclusions: The present cohort study was undertaken in the north Indian population to explore the association between dyslipidemia in pregnancy and its adverse maternal and fetal outcomes. It was seen that third trimester maternal dyslipidemia is associated with various maternal and fetal complications such as gestational diabetes mellitus, preeclampsia, IHCP, preterm labor, and SGA babies.


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